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Transform ordinary heavy cream into a thick, rich spread with this simple small batch Clotted Cream recipe. Perfect for topping scones or enhancing pastries, it’s a delightful addition to any morning tea or brunch. This recipe relies on the simplicity of its single ingredient and the magic of time, turning heavy cream into something truly special. With minimal effort and a touch of patience, you’ll create an indulgent treat that surpasses store-bought varieties.

Enjoy the rich, creamy texture of homemade clotted cream paired with a variety of our small batch scone recipes. Whether you prefer the classic simplicity of Cream Scones, the fruity sweetness of Strawberry Scones or Peach Scones, the zesty tang of Lemon Poppy Seed Scones, the vibrant flavor of Cranberry Orange Scones, or the savory goodness of Ham and Cheese Scones, this clotted cream is the perfect accompaniment.

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

  • Easy To Make: This recipe is incredibly simple, requiring minimal effort. Just pour the cream into a dish and let your oven do the rest.
  • Small Batch Perfection: Designed for one or two people, it avoids waste.
  • Save Money: Skip the expensive store-bought clotted cream and make your own for a fraction of the price.
  • No Special Equipment Needed: All you need is an oven and a shallow baking dish.
  • Versatility: Perfect with scones, pastries, or as a luxurious addition to desserts.

What Is Clotted Cream?

Clotted cream is a rich and incredibly delicious spreadable form of cream that is often served with scones and jam. It is made by putting high-fat cream into a shallow tray and heating and then cooling the cream. As the cream cools, the fats in the cream rise and form thick lumps, “clots” which are skimmed off and become the clotted cream.

This incredible cream spread originated in the counties of Devon and Cornwall, located in southwest England. Clotted cream is often referred to as Devonshire cream or Cornish cream.

a scone sliced in half on a blue plate with clotted cream spread over one side of the scone.

Ingredient Notes: Choosing The Right Cream For Clotted Cream

  • Heavy Cream: This is the star of the show! Here’s a breakdown of pasteurization and how it affects clotted cream:
    • Regular Pasteurized Cream (Preferred): This is your best bet. This type of cream undergoes a less intense heating process than ultra-pasteurized cream, leading to better curd formation.
    • Ultra-Pasteurized Cream (Works in a Pinch): While this cream is heated to a higher temperature for a longer shelf life, it can still be used to make clotted cream. The curds may not separate as prominently, but you’ll achieve a satisfactory result.

Don’t worry if you can’t find regular pasteurized cream! Finding regular pasteurized cream can be challenging. I’ve tested both ultra-pasteurized and regular pasteurized creams, and both work effectively. You can see the results in our recipe photos (made with ultra-pasteurized cream).

Here’s a quick summary of the creams we tested:

  • Ultra-pasteurized heavy cream (grocery store brand like Harris Teeter)
  • Ultra-pasteurized heavy whipping cream (local co-op brand like Organic Valley)
  • Pasteurized heavy whipping cream (local creamery brand)
three different types of cream on a brown cutting board.

Choose Your Baking Dish: Size Matters

For this small batch recipe, you’ll need a shallow baking dish. Here are some options that work well:

  • 8-inch x 6-inch Oval Baking Dish: This is my go-to size, offering a base area of around 38 square inches. It allows for even heating and perfect clotted cream results.
  • 8-inch x 8-inch Square Baking Pan: Another good option! This pan provides a similar amount of surface area and will work just fine for making your clotted cream.

Remember: The key is to use a shallow dish. This ensures the cream heats evenly throughout, leading to a successful batch of clotted cream.

a carton of heavy cream and an oval baking dish.
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How To Make Clotted Cream

  1. Start by preheating your oven to 175°F (80°C). Pour the cream into an 8×6 inch oval oven-safe dish and place it in the oven. Let it bake for 12 hours, which works well overnight. Be aware that some ovens may turn off automatically after a certain period, so check your oven’s manual and set an alarm to restart it if needed.
pouring heavy cream into an oval baking dish.
  1. After the 12-hour baking period, take the dish out of the oven. You’ll notice a yellowish layer on top – that’s your clotted cream.
clotted cream forming in a baking dish.
  1. Let the dish cool at room temperature, then cover it and place it in the refrigerator for another 12 hours to set.
  2. Following this refrigeration period, take the dish out and gently spoon the thick, buttery clotted cream into a jar, leaving the liquid (whey) behind. This leftover liquid is great for baking scones. The clotted cream you spoon out should have a rich, creamy texture, similar to crème fraîche but even creamier and slightly sweeter.

You can enjoy the clotted cream as it is, directly from the dish, or stir it for a lighter, smoother texture.

an overflowing jar of homemade clotted cream with the liquid in a jar in the background.

From the photos provided below, it’s evident that the clotted cream made from both ultra-pasteurized and pasteurized cream appears very similar in appearance.

spooning clotted cream out of a dish.
Clotted cream made from ultra-pasteurized cream
clotted cream in a yellow bowl.
Clotted cream made with pasteurized cream

Expert Tips

  • Ensure that your oven remains on for the entire cooking process. Some ovens automatically shut off after a set time, so it’s important to check your oven’s manual to see if this applies. If your oven does have an auto shut-off feature, set an alarm to turn it back on as needed.
  • If you’re interested in a larger quantity of clotted cream, this recipe can easily be doubled. Just remember to switch to a bigger baking dish, such as a 9×13-inch, to accommodate the increased amount of cream.
  • Don’t discard the liquid left at the bottom of the dish post-clotted cream preparation. It’s a great substitute for milk in recipes, particularly in making scones.

What To Serve With Clotted Cream

Enjoying homemade clotted cream is an experience in itself. Here are some delightful ways to enjoy it:

  • Classic Cream Tea: Spread clotted cream on warm scones alongside jam for a traditional English afternoon tea experience.
  • Top Your Pancakes or Waffles: Add a dollop of clotted cream to your favorite pancakes or waffles for a decadent breakfast or brunch treat.
  • Fresh Fruit Delight: Drizzle some honey or maple syrup over fresh berries and top them off with a spoonful of clotted cream for a light and refreshing dessert.
  • Coffee Break Companion: Add a touch of luxury to your coffee break by stirring a spoonful of clotted cream into your hot coffee.
  • Baked Apple Perfection: Elevate your baked apples by adding a scoop of clotted cream before baking for a warm and comforting dessert.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much clotted cream can I get from 1 pint of heavy cream?

1 cup of clotted cream.

How long does clotted cream last?

Homemade clotted cream will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days in an airtight container.
While this recipe is designed for enjoying fresh clotted cream, you can freeze leftovers for up to 3 months if needed. Be aware that freezing may cause a slight change in texture. If you do freeze your clotted cream, let it cool completely first. Transfer it to an airtight container suitable for freezing, label it with the date, and store it in the back of your freezer. When you’re ready to enjoy it again, thaw the clotted cream overnight in the refrigerator. Remember, it’s best not to refreeze thawed clotted cream. So, for the ultimate taste and texture, enjoy your clotted cream fresh whenever possible!

Can I speed up the process?

Unfortunately, no. The low and slow approach is key.

Why is my cream not clotting?

It could be due to the type of cream or variations in oven temperature.

Which should be spread first on scones: jam or clotted cream?

Traditionally, people in Devon spread clotted cream on the scones first and follow up with jam while the Cornish tradition is to spread jam first followed by the cream.

Ways To Use Leftover Ingredients

If you have any ingredients leftover from this recipe, check out our Leftover Ingredients Recipe Finder or you might like to consider using them in any of these single serving and small batch recipes:

If you’ve tried this small batch clotted cream or any recipe on One Dish Kitchen please let me know how you liked it by rating the recipe and telling me about it in the comment section below.

Also, if you take a picture please tag us on Instagram (@onedishkitchen) we’d love to see!


Your Cooking For One Source
Because you’re worth it

Small Batch Clotted Cream Recipe

4.80 from 5 votes
Cook: 12 hours
Chilling: 12 hours
Total: 1 day
Servings: 16 tablespoons (1 cup)
Create luxurious homemade Clotted Cream with this easy small batch recipe! Perfect for pastries, scones, and a touch of elegance to your morning tea.

Equipment

  • 8×6 inch oval baking dish or an 8×8 inch baking dish

Ingredients 
 

  • 1 pint heavy cream (2 cups) –See notes below
Save this Recipe!
Get this recipe sent to your inbox, plus get weekly recipes from us – all for free.

Instructions 

  • Start by preheating your oven to 175°F (80°C). Pour the cream into an 8×6 inch oval oven-safe dish and place it in the oven. Let it bake for 12 hours, which works well overnight. Be aware that some ovens may turn off automatically after a certain period, so check your oven's manual and set an alarm to restart it if needed.
  • After the 12-hour baking period, take the dish out of the oven. You'll notice a yellowish layer on top – that's your clotted cream.
  • Let the dish cool at room temperature, then cover it and place it in the refrigerator for another 12 hours to set.
  • Following this refrigeration period, take the dish out and gently spoon the thick, buttery clotted cream into a jar, leaving the liquid (whey) behind.
    Pro Tip: This leftover liquid is a great substitute for milk in recipes, particularly in making scones.
  • You can enjoy the clotted cream as it is, directly from the dish, or stir it for a lighter, smoother texture.

Notes

    • Heavy Cream: This is the star of the show! Here’s a breakdown of pasteurization and how it affects clotted cream:
        • Regular Pasteurized Cream (Preferred): This is your best bet. This type of cream undergoes a less intense heating process than ultra-pasteurized cream, leading to better curd formation.
        • Ultra-Pasteurized Cream (Works in a Pinch): While this cream is heated to a higher temperature for a longer shelf life, it can still be used to make clotted cream. The curds may not separate as prominently, but you’ll achieve a satisfactory result.
Don’t worry if you can’t find regular pasteurized cream! Finding regular pasteurized cream can be challenging. I’ve tested both ultra-pasteurized and regular pasteurized creams, and both work effectively. You can see the results in our recipe photos (made with ultra-pasteurized cream).
 
Expert Tips
  • Ensure that your oven remains on for the entire cooking process. Some ovens automatically shut off after a set time, so it’s important to check your oven’s manual to see if this applies. If your oven does have an auto shut-off feature, set an alarm to turn it back on as needed.
  • If you’re interested in a larger quantity of clotted cream, this recipe can easily be doubled. Just remember to switch to a bigger baking dish, such as a 9×13-inch, to accommodate the increased amount of cream.
  • Don’t discard the liquid left at the bottom of the dish post-clotted cream preparation. It’s a great substitute for milk in recipes, particularly in making scones.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tablespoon, Calories: 74kcal, Carbohydrates: 0.2g, Protein: 0.3g, Fat: 8g, Saturated Fat: 5g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.3g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2g, Cholesterol: 24mg, Sodium: 3mg, Potassium: 9mg, Sugar: 0.2g, Vitamin A: 435IU, Vitamin C: 0.2mg, Calcium: 20mg, Iron: 0.03mg

The information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

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21 Comments

  1. R. Lee says:

    I really appreciate that you addressed the UHT (ultra pasteurized issue). I live in a part of the world where that is the only option for all dairy products. For years I was told you couldn’t make clotted cream as a result. But thanks to you, I now know I can. I made the recipe once and it was fantastic. Even got a thumbs up from my British neighbor who knows the real thing! And, again, this is using UHT (ultra pasteurized) heavy cream. So it’s a hit and I’m currently making some more as I write this. I have one question. Can you let it refrigerate for more than 12 hours before you take the clotted cream off the top? In other words, is it more a 12 hours minimum or dies it have to be taken off at 12 hours? (Hoping my question makes sense.) The reason I’m asking is because on this batch the 12 hours will be up in the middle of the night. And I would rather get a good night’s sleep and wait til morning to scrape the clotted cream off the top (of the liquid). Will waiting 18 hours to do this step be a problem, do you think? Please let me know as I’ve tried Googling it and can’t find the answer. And thank you again for an amazing recipe!!!

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      It’s great to hear that you and your neighbor enjoyed the clotted cream! In my own experience, leaving the clotted cream in the refrigerator for more than 12 hours, like waiting until morning, hasn’t caused any issues. It should work out just fine for you too.

  2. Cori says:

    Used ultra pasteurized as that was all I could find. The top layer seems more like separated milkfat, is that right?

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      I find that there is a greater separation of curds from liquid when I use regular pasteurized cream but as shown in the photos, we used ultra-pasteurized cream successfully. The top layer is the part you want, it is the thick layer that looks almost like a “crust” and this is your clotted cream. The liquid below is the leftover whey and it can be used in any baked goods that call for using milk.

  3. Lisa Sharpe says:

    Could you make this in an instant on tge yogurt setting?

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      Hi Lisa, although I haven’t tested this recipe in the Instant Pot other readers have told me they have made clotted cream on the yogurt setting with success.