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Thick, rich, and indulgent clotted cream made with just 1 ingredient, heavy cream. Fantastic on scones, clotted cream is easy to make and so much better than the expensive imported brands.

I had my first taste of clotted cream while enjoying high tea in London’s famous department store, Fortnum & Mason several years ago. While I enjoyed everything served to us, from the mini tea sandwiches to the glorious pastries, the highlight for me were the buttery scones and clotted cream.

What Is Clotted Cream?

Clotted cream is a rich and incredibly delicious spreadable form of cream that is often served with scones and jam. It is made by putting high-fat cream into a shallow tray and heating and then cooling the cream. As the cream cools, the fats in the cream rise and form thick lumps, “clots” which are skimmed off and become the clotted cream.

This incredible cream spread originated in the counties of Devon and Cornwall, located in southwest England. Clotted cream is often referred to as Devonshire cream or Cornish cream.

Why This Recipe Works

  • It is difficult to find clotted cream in grocery stores outside of England because fresh clotted cream has a very short shelf life. With this easy clotted cream recipe, you can easily make your own to enjoy anytime you like.
  • Although it takes quite a lot of time to make clotted cream, the process is very easy. The cream needs to heat in the oven overnight at a very low temperature, for about 12 hours. After this time, it needs to cool for another 12 hours. It is basically a hands-off process, you only need time.
  • It’s rich with a silky texture and so incredibly delicious!
  • This is a small batch clotted cream recipe that is perfect for those cooking for one or two people.
a scone sliced in half on a blue plate with clotted cream spread over one side of the scone

Ingredient Notes: Pasteurized vs. Ultra-Pasteurized Cream

To make a small batch of clotted cream, you will need:

  • Heavy cream: For the very best results, use heavy cream that has not been ultra-pasteurized. Ultra-pasteurized cream has been heated beyond the regular pasteurizing method and then chilled. This gives it a longer shelf life. Ultra-pasteurized cream won’t separate as easily into large curds, but it will still work.
    • However, regular pasteurized milk is not always easy to find, so I experimented with making clotted cream with ultra-pasteurized cream and regular pasteurized cream, and both types WILL WORK. You will just have a greater separation of curds from liquid when using regular pasteurized cream. In fact, we used ultra-pasteurized heavy cream for the photos in this recipe and you can see from the pictures how the clotted cream looks.
    • The types of creams tested were: ultra-pasteurized, grocery-store heavy cream (Harris Teeter), ultra-pasteurized heavy whipping cream that I purchased from my local co-op (Organic Valley), and pasteurized heavy whipping cream purchased from my local creamery.
three different types of cream on a brown cutting board
  • A small baking dish: The dish I use most often when making small batches of clotted cream measures 8-inches x 6-inches and has a base area of 38 square inches. I have also used an 8-inch x 8-inch square baking pan with success.
a carton of heavy cream and an oval baking dish
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How To Make This Recipe

  1. Preheat the oven to 175 degrees F (80 degrees C). Pour the cream into an 8×6 inch oven-safe dish. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 12 hours. I usually put mine in the oven overnight so it is ready in the morning. Some ovens turn off after a certain amount of time, be sure to check your manual to make sure yours does not shut off automatically. If it does, set an alarm to turn it back on.
pouring heavy cream into an oval baking dish
  1. After 12 hours, remove the dish from the oven. Notice the yellow surface on top? This is the clotted cream.
clotted cream forming in a baking dish
  1. Allow to cool at room temperature and then cover and put it in the refrigerator for an additional 12 hours for it to set.
  2. After 12 hours, remove from the refrigerator and spoon the firm clotted cream into a jar leaving the liquid (whey) behind. The liquid can be used to make scones.

You will notice the lovely cream on the spoon. It should look thick and buttery on top.

spooning clotted cream out of a dish
Clotted cream made from ultra-pasteurized cream

The texture of clotted cream is similar to creme fraiche but is even creamier and slightly sweeter.

You can serve the clotted cream as is, straight from the pan or you can stir the curds together to get a lighter, whiter look.

clotted cream in a yellow bowl
Clotted cream made with pasteurized cream

As you can see from the photos above, the cream from both the ultra-pasteurized and pasteurized cream looks almost identical.

an overflowing jar of homemade clotted cream with the liquid in a jar in the background

Expert Tips

  • You will need to make sure that your oven does not turn off automatically. Some ovens turn off after a certain amount of time, be sure to check your manual to make sure yours does not shut off. If it does, set an alarm to turn it back on.
  • This recipe can be doubled if you would like to make a larger batch of clotted cream. Be sure to use a larger baking dish if you double the ingredients. A 9×13-inch dish would be perfect.
  • Save the liquid that is left in the bottom of the dish after you’ve made the clotted cream. Consider using it in place of milk in a scone recipe.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Much Clotted Cream Can I Get From 1 Pint of Cream?

This small batch clotted cream recipe yields 1 cup of clotted cream.

How Long Will Clotted Cream Last?

Store clotted cream in the refrigerator. It will last up to 5 days. Clotted cream can also be frozen although there will be a slight change in its texture. Clotted cream can be frozen for up to 3 months. Defrost frozen clotted cream in the refrigerator. Once thawed completely, it is ready to use. Do not refreeze the leftovers.

What Can Clotted Cream Be Used For?

I absolutely love spooning clotted cream over homemade scones. You can also stir it into mashed potatoes for a rich and delicious twist or serve with muffins or Irish soda bread. One of my favorite ways is to stir it into hot oatmeal with honey

Do You Put Jam or Clotted Cream on Scones First?

Traditionally, people in Devon spread clotted cream on the scones first and follow up with jam while the Cornish tradition is to spread jam first followed by the cream.

Why Is My Clotted Cream Yellow?

Don’t worry if your cream is a little bit yellow. This is normal. The yellow color is due to the high amount of butterfat in the cream.

Small Batch Scone Recipes

You might like to spread your homemade clotted cream over any of these delightful scone recipes:

Ways To Use Leftover Ingredients

If you have any ingredients leftover from this recipe, check out our Leftover Ingredients Recipe Finder or you might like to consider using them in any of these single serving and small batch recipes:

If you’ve tried this small batch clotted cream or any recipe on One Dish Kitchen please let me know how you liked it by rating the recipe and telling me about it in the comment section below.

Also, if you take a picture please tag us on Instagram (@onedishkitchen) we’d love to see!


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Because you’re worth it

Small Batch Clotted Cream Recipe

4.80 from 5 votes
Cook: 12 hours
Chilling: 12 hours
Total: 1 day
Servings: 1 cup
Discover how to make easy clotted cream with just heavy cream! This thick, rich, and indulgent topping is perfect for scones, making every bite luxurious. Unbelievably simple to make and so much better than the expensive imported brands.

Ingredients 
 

  • 1 pint heavy cream (2 cups)

Instructions 

  • Preheat the oven to 175 degrees F (80 degrees C).
  • Pour the cream into an 8×6 inch oven-safe dish. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 12 hours. I usually put mine in the oven overnight so it is ready in the morning. Some ovens turn off after a certain amount of time, be sure to check your manual to make sure yours does not shut off automatically. If it does, set an alarm to turn it back on.
  • After 12 hours, remove the dish from the oven.
  • Allow to cool at room temperature and then cover and put it in the refrigerator for an additional 12 hours for it to set.
  • After 12 hours, remove from the refrigerator and spoon the firm clotted cream into a jar leaving the liquid behind.

Notes

Expert Tips
  • You will need to make sure that your oven does not turn off automatically. Some ovens turn off after a certain amount of time, be sure to check your manual to make sure yours does not shut off. If it does, set an alarm to turn it back on.
  • This recipe can be doubled if you would like to make a larger batch of clotted cream. Be sure to use a larger baking dish if you double the ingredients. A 9×13-inch dish would be perfect.
  • Save the liquid that is left in the bottom of the dish after you’ve made the clotted cream. Consider using it in place of milk in a scone recipe.
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21 Comments

  1. Used ultra-pasteurized cream and was delighted with the results. I will never buy an overpriced jar again! $7.99 for a small jar at World Market and online. I got 4x as much cream from the recipe, and it cost me about $1.50. Thank you very much!

  2. Tried it for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee with great success! Mine was a little thick so had to stir in some of the liquid but otherwise tastes great and can’t wait to try it on scones I’m baking this week.

  3. I have made clotted cream using these exact same instructions from various sites. I also have found that you can use ultra pasteurized with virtually the same results. Most photos show the cream to be snowy white. You show yours to be more yellow. However I have made it covered and uncovered and it still comes out with a golden brown crust on top instead of yellow. I have actually checked it after only 4 hours and it is yellow but I left it in the oven for the full 12 hours. I have taken it out after 10 hours but it’s still more browned on top.My oven’s lowest setting is 180. It doesn’t make for a pretty cream like most recipe photos depict but it tastes good. Actually the crust is the tastiest part. Yesterday I made a stovetop version which took less than an hour. It is creamier and whiter and is pretty good but doesn’t have that slight caramelized flavor .

  4. My ovens lowest temperature is 200. Does this effect and reduce the cooking time because it is hotter? or will it still work at 200 degrees?

    1. Hi Bayley, my concern would be that the cream won’t clot properly. However, if you’d like to try it check your cream after 10 hours instead of 12 hours.

  5. I would love to make this clotted cream, my oven only goes to 200 Fahrenheit I wouldn’t normally worry but it’s in the oven for 12 hours is this possible for me to make this recipe?

  6. Thank you for your lovely recipes, Joanie.
    For this recipe, can I freeze the left over cream and re-use it?
    I am from South Africa.
    Minnie

    1. I’m so glad you are enjoying our recipes, Minnie. Yes, clotted cream can be frozen in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

  7. I’m a little confused. I live in Quebec, Canada. We generally have 3 kinds of cream here. 10% milk fat is used as coffee cream, 15% milk fat is usually used for cooking, and 35% is called whipping cream. Which of these should I use for this recipe?

  8. Omg! It worked with ultrapasturized cream. Delish, now onto making some cream scones to go with it! Thanks!

  9. I have found clotted cream in the refrigerated section at Whole Foods but as you said — it’s rather pricey. I have had tea at Fortnum & Masons and a pre-theater tea at The Savoy. My favorite tea room in London is Maids of Honor, near Kew Gardens. They have the best meat pies!