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This Rosemary Garlic Buttermilk Biscuits recipe yields the perfect about for one or two people to enjoy. If you love fresh biscuits but don’t want to make too many, this recipe is perfect, making four light and fluffy biscuits. They’re flavored with roasted garlic and fresh rosemary, making them a great choice for breakfast or as a lovely part of your dinner. These biscuits are simple to make with just a few ingredients and are so delicious that they’ll leave everyone wanting more.

If you’re a fan of this rosemary buttermilk biscuit recipe, you’re sure to enjoy our other small batch varieties: easy Drop Biscuits bursting with flavor, buttery and rich Butter Swim Biscuits, and the delightfully flavorful Biscuit with Sausage Gravy.

Why You’ll Love These Biscuits

  • Small Batch: This buttermilk biscuit recipe yields four perfect biscuits, making it ideal for single servings or smaller households.
  • Ease and Accessibility: No special equipment or advanced baking skills are required. This is a drop biscuit recipe, meaning you literally just drop the dough onto the baking sheet.
  • Flexibility: This recipe provides alternative ingredients for dietary restrictions, catering to a wide range of preferences.
  • Flavor Profile: The rosemary and garlic add a gourmet twist to traditional buttermilk biscuits, offering a savory taste that’s impossible to resist.
two rosemary garlic buttermilk biscuits on a blue plate.

Enhancing The Classic: How Garlic And Rosemary Transform Buttermilk Biscuits

Buttermilk biscuits, a cherished Southern classic, are renowned for their flaky texture and distinctive tangy taste, commonly made with everyday ingredients like flour, butter, and buttermilk. They fit effortlessly into any meal, be it paired with soups and stews or savored on their own.

Our take on this beloved recipe, the Rosemary Garlic Buttermilk Biscuits, introduces a gourmet twist. By infusing the dough with aromatic rosemary and fresh garlic, these biscuits gain an elevated flavor profile while retaining their characteristic tenderness.

We also embrace the ease of drop biscuits in this recipe. This method involves simply spooning the dough onto a baking sheet and baking it, ideal for those seeking a quick and easy baking process. This softer dough results in moist biscuits that rival the classic version in taste.

The garlic and rosemary version uses this no-fuss drop technique, allowing anyone to effortlessly prepare scrumptious biscuits with minimal equipment. Their rustic appearance is as appealing as their taste, ensuring these biscuits become a memorable addition to any meal.

Ingredients

ingredients in rosemary garlic buttermilk biscuits on a kitchen counter.
  • Flour: All-purpose flour is the standard for this recipe. However, for a gluten-free alternative, you can use a 1:1 gluten-free baking flour.
  • Butter: I use salted butter in this buttermilk biscuit recipe but you can use unsalted butter if you’d prefer. Feel free to swap the butter with a plant-based substitute.
  • Buttermilk: Buttermilk is not just the ingredient that gives buttermilk biscuits a slight tang, it provides the necessary acid to react with the baking soda which helps to make the biscuits rise. Buttermilk also helps to break down strands of gluten in the batter, which makes buttermilk biscuits fluffy, tender, and soft in the middle. See the FAQ section below to see how to make this recipe if you don’t have buttermilk and if you have leftover buttermilk, consider using it in a Mini Buttermilk Pie!
  • Baking powder and baking soda: Both of these are chemical leaveners typically used in buttermilk biscuits. They are used to help the biscuits rise. Baking powder provides a rise in two ways, when it is mixed with the buttermilk and when it is exposed to heat. When baking soda is combined with an acid, like buttermilk, it causes the biscuits to rise. So by using both, you’ll have fluffier biscuits.
  • Salt and sugar: A small amount of salt and sugar are used for flavor.
  • Garlic: This recipe brings the warm, savory notes of garlic to the forefront by utilizing a whole small head of garlic. However, it’s essential to keep in mind that not all heads of garlic are created equal – they come in a variety of sizes, and the flavor strength can vary from one to another. In this particular recipe, I used a small head of garlic and used 5 whole cloves. This amount provided a robust yet balanced garlic flavor, complementing the rosemary perfectly without overpowering the biscuit’s overall taste. If your head of garlic is larger or you prefer a milder garlic flavor, feel free to adjust the number of cloves to suit your personal preference. Remember, cooking is an art, not a science – you’re free to tweak the recipe to make it your own! If you use a large head of garlic and have leftover roasted garlic cloves – you’re in luck. Use some of the roasted garlic to spread on bread or toast. It can be used as is or mixed with butter or cream cheese for an extra creamy spread. Also consider mixing roasted garlic cloves into mashed potatoes, cauliflower purée, or any puréed dishes for a subtle, sweet garlic flavor.
  • Olive oil: I drizzle a small amount of extra virgin olive oil over the top of the garlic before roasting. Extra virgin olive oil is the least processed form of olive oil. It is an unrefined oil and the highest-quality olive oil you can buy. Because of the way extra virgin olive oil is made, it retains a more true olive taste. It also contains more of the vitamins and minerals found in olives. It’s my favorite type of olive oil, but you may use light olive oil instead.
  • Fresh rosemary: Fresh rosemary is much better to use than dried rosemary in this biscuit recipe.

This is just an overview of the ingredients I used and why I used them. For the full recipe please scroll down to the recipe box at the bottom of the post.

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How To Make Buttermilk Biscuits With Garlic And Rosemary

These step-by-step photos and instructions are here to help you visualize how to make these buttermilk biscuits. See the recipe box below for ingredient amounts and full recipe instructions.

  1. Roast the garlic: Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C).
  2. Peel and discard the papery outer layers of the whole head of garlic. Leave intact the skins of the individual cloves of garlic.
the papery outer layers of a head of garlic resting next to the head of garlic on a cutting board.
  1. Using a sharp knife, cut 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the top of the cloves. This will expose the individual cloves of garlic.
a head of garlic with the top cut off on a wooden cutting board.
  1. Place the garlic head on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle olive oil over the top.
a head of garlic with olive oil drizzled on top on a sheet of aluminum foil.
  1. Seal the foil around the garlic and place on a baking sheet.
a head of garlic wrapped in aluminum foil on a baking sheet.
  1. Roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until the garlic is completely tender when poked with a knife. Remove from the oven to cool.
one head of roasted garlic on a sheet of aluminum foil.
  1. Make the biscuit dough. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt. Toss the cold and cubed butter into the flour.
flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt, and cubed butter in a mixing bowl.
  1. Working quickly, using your fingers or a pastry blender, rub or cut the butter into the flour until it resembles coarse sand.
  2. Stir in the chopped rosemary.
chopped rosemary whisked into flour in a mixing bowl.
  1. Use a small knife to cut the skin slightly around each clove. Use a fork or your fingers to pull or squeeze the roasted garlic cloves out of their skins and place them in a small bowl.
  2. Gently stir in the buttermilk.
a bowl filled with buttermilk and roasted garlic cloves.
  1. Pour the buttermilk/garlic mixture into the flour mixture and gently stir to combine.
rosemary garlic buttermilk biscuit batter in a mixing bowl.
  1. Bake the biscuits. Using a large spoon, drop spoonfuls of the garlic biscuit dough onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.
four unbaked garlic biscuits on a baking sheet.
  1. Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes.
four baked garlic rosemary biscuits on baking sheet.

Expert Tips

  • Read through the entire recipe and the Ingredient Notes section of the post and gather your ingredients. We provide a lot of information within the body of this easy biscuit recipe post to ensure that your biscuits come out perfectly every time.
  • Measure ingredients correctly. This is so important. To measure flour correctly, stir the flour in its container with a spoon. Then, use a spoon to scoop flour into a dry measuring cup and slightly overfill. Then, use the back of a knife or other straight-edged utensil to level the flour across the cup. Do not scoop the flour. When you scoop, the flour gets packed too tightly and you will end up with more flour than the recipe calls for.
  • Use Cold Butter: The secret to flaky biscuits lies in cold butter. It creates steam as it melts in a hot oven, leading to those lovely, airy pockets.
  • Don’t Overwork the Dough: When you’re combining the ingredients, less is more. Overworking can result in tough biscuits.
  • Bake the biscuits until they’re golden brown.

Serving Suggestions

These buttermilk biscuits are a delight to have on their own. However, they also make a great side to a hearty beef stew or flavorful tortellini soup. Try them with a bowl of tomato soup or a creamy chicken and rice casserole for a comforting meal. You can also use these savory biscuits as a base for a savory Eggs Benedict for a luxurious breakfast.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use dried rosemary?

Yes, you can use dried rosemary in this recipe. However, I recommend using fresh rosemary, as it will give the biscuits a more pronounced flavor. If you do use dried rosemary, use half the amount of fresh rosemary that the recipe calls for.

Can I freeze buttermilk biscuits?

Absolutely. Once they’re cooled, place the rosemary biscuits in a freezer-friendly bag. They can be frozen for up to 3 months.

Do I have to use buttermilk in this biscuit recipe?

No, you do not have to use buttermilk in this recipe. However, I highly recommend it, as it gives the biscuits a more tender and flavorful texture. If you do not have buttermilk on hand, you can make your own by adding 2 teaspoons of lemon juice or white vinegar to 1/2 cup of milk. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes before using it in the recipe.

Can I double this buttermilk biscuit recipe?

Yes, you can double this recipe to make a larger batch of biscuits. Simply double all of the ingredients and follow the recipe instructions as written.

one rosemary garlic buttermilk biscuit cut in half with butter melting over the top.

Ways To Use Leftover Ingredients

If you have any ingredients leftover from this recipe, check out our Leftover Ingredients Recipe Finder or you might like to consider using them in any of these single serving and small batch recipes:

For more information on the cooking and baking dishes I use in our “recipes for one”, please visit our FAQ page.

For examples of the dishes used at One Dish Kitchen, please visit our Store page.

If you’ve tried this easy biscuit recipe or any recipe on One Dish Kitchen please let me know how you liked it by rating the recipe and telling me about it in the comment section below.

Also, if you take a picture please tag us on Instagram (@onedishkitchen) we’d love to see it!


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Because you’re worth it

Small Batch Buttermilk Biscuits

5 from 2 votes
Prep: 35 minutes
Cook: 12 minutes
Total: 47 minutes
Servings: 4 biscuits
Bake irresistible small batch rosemary garlic buttermilk biscuits. Soft, herb-infused, and easy to make. The perfect small batch indulgence.

Ingredients 
 

  • 1 small head of garlic
  • ¼ teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons salted butter , cold and cut into ¼ inch pieces
  • 1 ½ teaspoons chopped rosemary
  • ½ cup buttermilk
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Instructions 

Roast the garlic (see the photos in the recipe post if needed)

  • Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C).
  • Peel and discard the papery outer layers of the whole head of garlic. Leave intact the skins of the individual cloves of garlic.
  • Using a sharp knife, cut ¼ to ½ inch from the top of the cloves. This will expose the individual cloves of garlic.
  • Place the garlic head on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle olive oil over the top.
    Seal the foil around the garlic and place on a baking sheet.
  • Roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until the garlic is completely tender when poked with a knife. Remove from the oven to cool.
    Note: You will be using 5 cloves of roasted garlic in this biscuit recipe.

Make the biscuit dough

  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt.
    Toss the cold and cubed butter into the flour.
  • Working quickly, using your fingers or a pastry blender, rub or cut the butter into the flour until it resembles coarse sand.
  • Stir in the chopped rosemary.
  • Use a small knife to cut the skin slightly around each clove. Use a fork or your fingers to pull or squeeze 5 of the roasted garlic cloves out of their skins and place them in a small bowl.
  • Gently stir in the buttermilk.
  • Pour the buttermilk/garlic mixture into the flour mixture and gently stir to combine.

Bake the biscuits

  • Using a large spoon, drop spoonfuls of the garlic biscuit dough onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat.
  • Bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes.

Notes

Expert Tips
  • Read through the entire recipe and the Ingredient Notes section of the post and gather your ingredients. We provide a lot of information within the body of this recipe post to ensure that your biscuits come out perfectly every time.
  • Measure ingredients correctly. This is so important. To measure flour correctly, stir the flour in its container with a spoon. Then, use a spoon to scoop flour into a dry measuring cup and slightly overfill. Then, use the back of a knife or other straight-edged utensil to level the flour across the cup. Do not scoop the flour. When you scoop, the flour gets packed too tightly and you will end up with more flour than the recipe calls for.
  • Cold Butter is Key: The secret to flaky biscuits lies in cold butter. It creates steam as it melts in a hot oven, leading to those lovely, airy pockets.
  • Don’t Overwork the Dough: When you’re combining the ingredients, less is more. Overworking can result in tough biscuits.

Nutrition

Serving: 1biscuit, Calories: 213kcal, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 4g, Fat: 9g, Saturated Fat: 6g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.5g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2g, Trans Fat: 0.3g, Cholesterol: 26mg, Sodium: 565mg, Potassium: 77mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 3g, Vitamin A: 312IU, Calcium: 101mg, Iron: 2mg

The information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

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6 Comments

  1. Toddie says:

    Looks delicious, but do you chop up the 5 roasted garlic cloves or leave them whole? Seems like you need to do something with them otherwise someone might get a big chunk of garlic or two in their biscuit.

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      I do not chop the roasted cloves of garlic, I just add them in whole. Roasted garlic is so buttery and soft and has an almost sweet taste and so I love ending up with chunks of roasted garlic in every bite. I often find that when I mix the garlic in with the other ingredients, the soft garlic sometimes tends to break apart. In the end, it’s up to you. Feel free to chop them before adding them to the biscuit dough if you prefer.

  2. Denise says:

    Do you mash the cooked garlic cloves or leave them whole?

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      I leave them whole. After roasting, the cloves are very soft so they break apart on their own slightly when mixed with the other ingredients. Getting pieces of the roasted garlic in each bite of the biscuit is my favorite part.

  3. J.Hegyi says:

    Good recipe.

    1. Joanie Zisk says:

      Thank you so much!